Home Archives January 2008 Luxury chairs for any body, at any price

Luxury chairs for any body, at any price

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, January 01, 2008
Chairs0108.jpg The Life chair by Knoll Seating adjusts to the user’s weight without any knobs or levers. It has a mesh back with a frame that flexes when the user reclines. It includes partially recycled materials and zero-VOC paints and adhesives. ($799)
The Leap chair by Steel Case has a back that changes shape to mimic spinal motion while maintaining lumbar support. You can adjust the seat depth, and it is 94% recyclable.  ($1,199)
The Freedom chair by Human Scale has a system of pivot points that adjust to and support the body. The headrest moves when you recline or sit upright, and armrests move in tandem to prevent uneven arm positions. ($1,240)

Gone are the days when the best desk chair in the office had the most knobs and levers. “People are looking for chairs with design built into them, so the chair moves with the person,” says Hugh Donnelly, a workplace consultant at Steelcase, a national office furniture company. “The fewer the adjustments they have to make, the better.”

Today’s high-end chairs are designed with materials that adjust to the user’s body, says Jayson Gates, sales executive at Portland-based Corporate Environments, which fits with the idea of having employees move from workspace to workspace in a team setting. “People want to sit down in any chair and have it fit their body,” Gates says.

Ergonomics still matter, but designers have a new sense of what exactly that means. “If someone tells you, ‘This is how you should be sitting,’ beware,” Donnelly says. “You should be moving around in your chair, keeping blood flowing through the spine.” Therefore, the best chairs encourage movement without requiring adjustments.

In addition to using green materials and ensuring that a chair can easily be recycled at the end of its life, companies continue to focus on aesthetics. “Design is just as important as function,” says Chris Corrado, CEO of Corporate Environments. “People don’t like ugly chairs.”         

LUCY BURNINGHAM


Send comments to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

Back to School

September 2014
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
BY LEE VAN DER VOO

By now we’ve all read the headlines: Starbucks is giving away free degrees. Except it isn’t.


Read more...

The Backstory

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014

In our cover story this month, Wendy Collie, CEO of New Seasons Market, and Kim Malek, owner of Salt & Straw, discuss their rapidly growing businesses and Portland’s red hot food scene. The conversation provides an interesting lens through which to explore trends in the grocery store and restaurant sectors.


Read more...

Podcast: Interview with Pete Friedes

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, August 27, 2014

082714-thumb friedesbookTom Cox interviews Pete Friedes, author of "The 2R Manager," about becoming a Best Boss.


Read more...

October surprise

News
Sunday, October 12, 2014
roundup-logo-thumb-14BY LINDA BAKER

Cylvia Hayes, tabloid vs. watchdog journalism and the looming threat of a Cascadia earthquake.


Read more...

The 100 Best Nonprofits to Work for in Oregon 2014

October 2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014
14BY KIM MOORE

Proud, diverse and underpaid.

Pride in their organizations’ mission, fairness in the treatment of women and ethnic minorities, flexible work schedules — these are just a handful of workplace characteristics that employees of this year’s 100 Best Nonprofits appreciate about their organizations.


Read more...

Innovation: a critique

News
Wednesday, October 08, 2014
1008 innovation thumbBY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

A Design Week panel discussion raises questions about how innovative we really are.


Read more...

Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS