Business travel: carry-on bag comparison

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, January 01, 2008

Here are Fink’s picks for business travelers:
ZeroHalliburton.jpg Zero Halliburton, 21” Polycarbonate 4-Wheel Zeroller ($275)
Shell is made of a polycarbonate, which makes the piece affordable, durable and lightweight. Integrated TSA lock system. Removable tri-fold suiter.
BriggsRiley.jpg Briggs & Riley, 22” Carry-On Superlight Upright ($299)
A light upright. Special pocket for hassle-free security checks. Built-in garment sleeve holds one or two suits. Good for a two- to four-day trip.
Pathfinder.jpg Pathfinder, Revolution 22” Auto-Expand Trolley ($249)
Affordable and well constructed. Expandability feature adds 30% packing capacity. Removable suiter. Good for three- to five-day trip.

In these days of long security lines and lost luggage, a good bag can make or break a business trip. Most business travelers prefer a carry-on, which minimizes the chance of airlines losing or mangling a bag. Emily Naslund-Smith, owner of Destinations-The Travel Store in Eugene, says she’s seen an increased interest in unconditional warranties for luggage. “Airlines can really do a number on bags,” she says.

Check size requirements for both domestic and international flights, as they often differ, and beware of weight limits, which will affect not only the size and type of bag you choose, but what you pack. Alex Fink, owner of Fink’s Luggage in Portland, says that a lighter bag means sacrificing durability as companies use lower-quality frames, parts and construction. He recently experienced success on a trip to Asia with a polycarbonate case that kept his suits crisp and weighed in under the limit.

In terms of security, Naslund-Smith recommends choosing a bag that offers easy access to two items: your laptop, which should be removed at the security gate, and the Ziploc bag filled with any containers carrying liquids (check tsa.gov for the latest restrictions). Also, consider using folders and cubes for your clothing when packing, which will make repacking after an encounter with a security screener a snap.         

LUCY BURNINGHAM


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Behind the curtain: What students should know about accreditation and rankings

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 04, 2014
120414-edurating-thumbBY DEBRA RINGOLD | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

How important are institutional and/or program evaluations provided by third parties in selecting a college or university program?


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


Read more...

Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


Read more...

Political Clout

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


Read more...

The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


Read more...

See How They Run

January-Powerbook 2015
Friday, December 12, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

Studying ground-running birds, a group that ranks among nature's speediest and most agile bipedal runners, to build a faster robot.


Read more...

The short list: 5 companies making a mint off kale

The Latest
Thursday, November 20, 2014
kale-thumbnailBY OB STAFF

Farmers, grocery stores and food processors cash in on kale.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS