Sponsored by Oregon Business

New year, new you

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, January 01, 2008


It’s that time of year again. But instead of simply going through the motions and creating an average list of New Year’s resolutions (how many times can you vow to get organized or lose weight?), take a fresh approach. Resolve to make yourself whole on a deeper level. As a result, you’ll notice positive changes in everything from work and relationships to free time and physical health. We asked Kelley Black of Balancing the Executive Life, a New York-based company, and Lisa Renee Anderson, a career and life coach in Eugene, to come up with five meaningful resolutions.

  1. Master your own breath. Because your breathing shortens and quickens when you’re under stress, making you less efficient, practicing a few basic breathing exercises will help you stay sharp, focused and in control under any circumstances. “It’s a powerful tool that makes you less reactive,” Black says. “Not only does your physiology change with each breath, but your mind gains a neutral point from which to function.”
  2. Take time for personal and spiritual development. “People tend to get two-dimensional, especially in the business world,” says Anderson. “By taking time for yourself and reflection, you become a complete person.” Your version may include learning a new language, attending church, going for a run or reading an inspirational book.
  3. Create time for professional development. Get out of career slumps by signing up for training on your own, apart from your company. “Get excited about something work-related again in your own way,” Anderson advises. “It’s important to reinvigorate your passion and curiosity.”
  4. Be still for some amount of time every day. “Think about being still for just three, five or seven minutes,” Black recommends. “Just sit and connect with your breath and yourself.” By indulging in a few minutes of quiet, you’ll clear your mind and your body. Try it before going to bed to make peace with the day and enjoy a deeper sleep.
  5. Learn when to hang in there and when to quit. People tend to fall into one of two categories, explains Anderson. Either they quit at the drop of a hat or hang in for way too long. By learning to evaluate your circumstances, you can become the happy medium. “It’s a simple skill that can be developed,” she says.

Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

More Articles

Mayoral musings

Linda Baker
Tuesday, September 15, 2015
091515-mayors-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

The 2016 presidential election is shaping up to be the year of the outsider, with Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump capturing leads in the polls and the headlines. In Portland, Wheeler vs. Hales is bucking the outlier trend.


Grain Food

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015

A Power Lunch at Bob's Red Mill Whole Grain Store and Restaurant.


After the Orange Line

Linda Baker
Tuesday, September 08, 2015
090815-trimet-thumbBY LINDA BAKER

Alan Lehto, TriMet's director of policy & planning, shares a few thoughts on ride sharing and more nimble bus services.


Reader Input: School Choice

September 2015
Thursday, August 20, 2015

Which of the following would be most effective in reducing the cost of operating a public university in Oregon?


Living the dream

Friday, August 21, 2015

smugglespearsthumbRenee Spears, founder and owner of Portland-based Rose City Mortgage, is hot to trot to sell pot.


Up on the Roof

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015

In 2010 Vanessa Keitges and several investors purchased Portland-based Columbia Green Technologies, a green-roof company. The 13-person firm has a 200% annual growth rate, exports 30% of its product to Canada and received its first infusion of venture capital in 2014 from Yaletown Venture Partners. CEO Keitges, 40, a Southern Oregon native who serves on President Obama’s Export Council, talks about market innovation, scaling small business and why Oregon is falling behind in green-roof construction. 


Back to School

September 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Oregon is home to an abundance of gritty warehouses reborn as trendy office spaces, as well as crafty hipsters turned entrepreneurs. Does the combination yield an equally bounteous office products sector? Not so much. Occupying the limited desk jockey space are Field Notes, a spinoff of Portland’s Draplin Design Company, and Schuttenworks, known for whittling Apple device stands. For a full complement of keyboard trays, docking stations and mouse pads, check out the GroveMade line, guaranteed to boost the cachet of even the lowliest cubicle drone. 

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02