Let the party begin

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Tuesday, January 01, 2008

{safe_alt_text} ROBIN DOUSSARD

Bidding adieu to the old and ringing in the new is one of my favorite times of the year. It’s a chance to reflect on what we’ve accomplished at the magazine, the things we still want to do, and then head out to a rip-snorting party.

For Oregon Business, the past year has been transformative.

As always, the year began with our annual 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon. And this year’s 14th edition to be showcased in our March issue will be no different. The results are in and we’re preparing the package. The secret will be revealed at our Feb. 26 celebration, so please join us (you can register by going to oregonbusiness.com/100Best).

In the spring, we enhanced our statewide depth by adding Deal Watch, which recaps the big deals of the past month, and Economix, a monthly missive from some of the state’s leading economists. Then in the fall we redesigned the magazine, with art director Jon Ferland creating a smart, updated look for our 26-year-old magazine. Along with the redesign, we beefed up our signature Around the State report, an essential resource for keeping up with statewide issues; added Next, which focuses on innovation; and created the new BizLife department.

Also in the fall, we embarked on an ambitious tour that took us to 22 communities in every corner of the state. The Business is Good tour was a great way to get a concentrated, bird’s-eye view of what’s happening in this big, independent state, and we told only a few of the stories we found along the way in our November issue.  

Throughout the year, we also tackled critical issues  from the looming state water crisis to the emerging tribal economies to homegrown discoveries that could change the world. Connecting the dots on important statewide stories will continue to be our hallmark as we enter a new year that will be no less ambitious.  

In the coming months, we also will continue the Business is Good tour, focusing on regional visits that will give communities and business leaders a chance to connect, share and celebrate. We were asked by many who participated in last year’s tour to continue the road show. Many communities didn’t have the opportunity to join in (we had about twice as many interested as we could accommodate), and we hope to eventually bring the tour to those areas.

We’re also going to enhance our website (oregonbusiness.com) with real-time stock information and improved navigation. Oregonbusiness.com is the only website that sifts through hundreds of daily Oregon news stories to bring you a tightly focused report on that day’s essential business news. Added to that, we plan a daily e-newsletter tailored to the interests of our subscribers.

These are all ways that oregonbusiness.com) with real-time stock information and improved navigation. Oregonbusiness.com is the only website that sifts through hundreds of daily Oregon news stories to bring you a tightly focused report on that day’s essential business news. Added to that, we plan a daily e-newsletter tailored to the interests of our subscribers.

These are all ways that oregonbusiness.com) with real-time stock information and improved navigation. Oregonbusiness.com is the only website that sifts through hundreds of daily Oregon news stories to bring you a tightly focused report on that day’s essential business news. Added to that, we plan a daily e-newsletter tailored to the interests of our subscribers.

These are all ways that Oregon Business strives to bring you business intelligence from around the state, whether in our magazine, on our website, in our  newsletter or by showing up in your community.

Here’s to a great New Year from all of us to all of you. Hope you have a rip-snorter of your own.

 

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There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

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Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

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Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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