Sequential eyes Port of Umatilla for future plant

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, April 01, 2008

UMATILLA Sequential-Pacific Biodiesel hasn’t even finished expanding capacity at its Salem plant, and it is already looking into building another factory at the Port of Umatilla.

The port has received a $500,000 federal grant to develop a facility that would connect rural farmers with urban consumers who are willing to pay a premium for “Made-in-Oregon” fuel. Port of Umatilla general manager Kim Puzey is encouraging local wheat growers to use canola as a rotation crop to supply the plant. The biodiesel produced at the new plant could be blended into fuel barged upriver to meet new state requirements, as well as shipped down the Columbia River to Portland.

The City of Portland is already the only city in the nation with a contract in place guaranteeing local farmers a competitive price for canola. Kent Madison of Echo processes canola oil year-round for the city from grains harvested each July. But the oil Madison and other growers produce has to be trucked to the Sequential-Pacific plant in Salem to be processed. A local plant in Umatilla would cut transport costs and pollution by using river barges. It would also contribute to the rapid growth of Sequential-Pacific, a joint venture between Sequential Biofuels of Portland and Eugene and Pacific Biodiesel of Maui, Hawaii.

The 30-employee company completed Oregon’s first biodiesel plant in Salem in August 2005 and is already working to expand capacity from 1 million to 5 million gallons per year, in addition to building new fueling stations in Eugene and Portland.

“The market is really growing and we’re just trying to keep up with it,” says Sequential-Pacific’s plant manager, Tyson Keever.                              

BEN JACKLET


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

More Articles

Can small be large?

Linda Baker
Wednesday, April 01, 2015
040115-lindablogthumbBY LINDA BAKER

Leaders in Oregon's ag sector gathered this morning in Portland’s Coopers Hall winery/taproom to discuss the role of the region as an export gateway, impediments to exporting products and solutions to containerized shipping challenges.


Read more...

Shades of Gray

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Are we too quick to diagnose corruption?


Read more...

Short Shrift:The threat of just-in-time scheduling

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Companies can benefit when they use software to meet staffing requirements and address employees' family and life commitments.


Read more...

Sun set

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

The right sunglasses can protect your eyes and look cool at the same time. This being the 21st century, select shades are socially conscious, too. Portland brand Shwood uses wood and other natural materials and manufactures locally. Founded by Ann Sacks, the brand Fetch dedicates a portion of its profits to animal welfare. But whether you choose classic tortiseshell or aviator chic, please, shed the sunglasses when you walk in the door — and, of course, at night. 


Read more...

6 development projects reshaping Bend

The Latest
Thursday, April 09, 2015
bendthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Bend has reclaimed its prerecession title as one of the fastest growing cities in the country.


Read more...

Undersea Power

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

Mike Morrow and Mike Delos-Reyes first came up with the idea of an ocean power device 23 years ago, when they were students at Oregon State University. They realized a long-held vision last summer, when their startup, M3 Wave, successfully launched the first ocean power device that works underwater.


Read more...

5 questions for inDinero CEO Jessica Mah

The Latest
Tuesday, March 31, 2015
jessicathumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

inDinero, a business that manages back-office accounting for startups and smaller companies, recently announced it would relocate its headquarters from San Francisco to Portland. We talked to CEO Jessica Mah about what drew her to Portland and how she plans to disrupt the traditional CPA model.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS