The trouble with anonymous complaints

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Tuesday, April 01, 2008

I just read “Troubling truths” [100 BEST COMPANIES, MARCH] and having heard those same complaints about my management style, I must ask: Where is the truly objective examination of the anger, sadness and frustration reported by all of those mismanaged employees?

Several years ago, when my ex-partner hired a consultant to help with workplace issues we were experiencing, I found the employees who complained the longest and the loudest, when allowed to do so anonymously, contributed the least, took the most and created, rather than solved, problems in the organization.

I guess it could be argued that including your “truths” adds some form of balance to the praise given to other companies in the magazine but in “truth,” they have no value as they have not been qualified in any manner.

Bob Peterson, president
Allied Power Products
Beaverton


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