Graphic: Best Companies stress wellness despite low importance to employees

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Thursday, May 01, 2008

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Best Companies help make their employees fit


Of the 312 employers who participated in our 2008 100 Best survey, less than half provide an on-site fitness facility or subsidize fitness center membership for their employees, in constrast to the 100 Best Companies

Employees rate fitness facilities low compared to other work benefits


While 100 Best survey participants rated “wellness programs and fitness facilities” higher in importance than satisfaction, it was the second lowest ranked in terms of importance among all statements of the survey (just above “support for additional education not directly related to job”).
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