Bend guitar-maker makes environmental commitment

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Thursday, May 01, 2008

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BEND Breedlove Guitar Co. will plant trees through-out the Northwest to compensate for those chop-ped down for its guitars. The type of trees to be planted, known as “tone” woods (such as California walnut and red spruce), won’t be ready for at least 100 years. Working with Aprovecho, a forestry nonprofit in Cottage Grove, the Bend-based company will plant between 10,000 and 20,000 trees annually — one for each instrument sold, says company president Pete Newport.




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