Local newspapers are caught in the Net

| Print |  Email
Sunday, June 01, 2008

STATEWIDE Since 2005, Monday through Friday circulation has dropped by 33,000 at the Oregonian, 6,000 at the Salem Statesman Journal and 3,400 at the Eugene Register-Guard. At the same time the number of independent blogs based in Oregon is up to 1,600 and rising, and the nemesis of the newspaper industry, Craigslist,  has established vibrant online markets for its free classified and low-cost job ads in Portland, Salem, Eugene, Corvallis, Bend, the Oregon Coast and Medford-Ashland-Klamath.

With advertising revenues dropping, layoffs and buyouts are a constant threat. The Portland Tribune recently laid off the bulk of its copy editing team and two writers. The publisher and the editor for the tiny weekly Bandon Western World were replaced by one editor/publisher from Lee Enterprises, which runs 55 dailies and more than 300 non-dailies in 23 states. In Vancouver, the Columbian has eliminated 30 positions this year.

The Tribune’s most recent layoffs come as the paper moves to publishing once instead of twice a week while attempting to bolster its website, portlandtribune.com. One of the jobs lost in that transition was the fulltime web reporter.

The proliferation of information sources on the Internet has created fewer rather than more journalism positions. Oregon’s more successful blogs, such as Jack Bog’s Blog, Blue Oregon, and Bike Portland, draw around 40,000 page views per week, enough to bring in targeted advertising revenue. But even the hottest of the local blogs remain largely one-person enterprises, better suited for creating content than jobs.                           

BEN JACKLET


To comment, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

The Human Factor

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015
BY BRIAN LIBBY

Matt French opens up South Waterfront.


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Tortoise and the Hare

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015

The day after this issue goes to press, the city of Medford will host its annual business conference. The event features Minoli Ratnatunga, co-author of the Milken Institute’s annual “Best-Performing Cities” report. Preliminary data suggests that Medford is likely to retain its No. 1 ranking among best-performing small cities for having a higher concentration of high-tech firms than the national average. 


Read more...

Game On

March 2015
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

The big news at Oregon Business is we’re getting a ping pong table. After reading the descriptions of the 2015 100 Best Companies to Work For in Oregon, a disproportionate number of which feature table tennis in the office, I decided it was time to bring our own workplace into the 21st century. It was a tough call, but it’s lonely at the top, and someone has to make the hard decisions.


Read more...

Party Like It’s 1999

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, February 25, 2015
pets-com-sock-puppetBY JASON NORRIS, CFA | OB GUEST BLOGGER

Pets.com, GeoCities, eToys, and WorldCom … blasts-from-the-past that all signify the late 1990s Internet bubble. Yet we believe the dynamics of the market, specifically in technology stocks, are much different today than it was during the late 1990s.


Read more...

That's Not a Watch (This Is a Watch)

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Smartwatches are all the rage. But old-fashioned timepieces keep on ticking.


Read more...

The Carbon Calculus

February 2015
Friday, January 23, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

Carbon pricing is gaining momentum in Oregon, sparking concern for energy-intensive businesses — but also opportunity to expand a homespun green economy.


Read more...

How Oregon will survive the loss of Hanjin

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT | OB CONTRIBUTOR

"Shipping containers to Portland is like waiting for a bus that travels once a day."


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS