Home Archives June 2008 Scoot on over to a better gas bill

Scoot on over to a better gas bill

| Print |  Email
Sunday, June 01, 2008

Scooter2.jpg

Once upon a time, gas was relatively inexpensive and behemoth, gas-guzzling vehicles were all the rage. Dinosaurs once roamed the earth, too.

But with $4-a-gallon gas on the horizon, filling a big tank can be an act of financial self-destruction. Maybe it’s time to ditch the car and get a scooter? After all, most scooters get an average of 75 to 80 mpg.

Scooters are like the short history of soccer in the United States, says Stephan Henkel, owner of Scooter Station in Portland. The rest of the world has long been passionate about them as efficient and stylish transportation, but few people here know anything about them, says Henkel.

“In America, big is what counts,” he says.

That could be changing. Over the past decade, new scooter sales in the United States have climbed from about 12,000 in 1997 to 131,000 in 2007, according to the trade group Motorcycle Industry Council.

Paula Daniels, co-owner of Scooter Street in Portland, says she’s seeing more customers interested in buying a scooter not just for recreation, but also to be thrifty. “A lot of people can’t afford to buy a hybrid car,” she says.

Newer scooters are also cleaner for the environment, Henkel says. Scooters with the more recent 4-stroke engine technology are more fuel-efficient and emit less carbon than the older 2-stroke type, while electric scooters reign supreme atop the eco-friendly pyramid.

Depending on the power and make, a new 49cc scooter with a top speed of about 40 mph can cost around $1,600, while more powerful and faster 150cc and 250cc scooters cost between $3,500 and $4,500.

With that, a scooter could be economical for both businesses and consumers. Not only do they cost less and use less gas, but many parking garages give the little guys a price break.                                  

JASON SHUFFLER



To comment, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

Rapid ascent

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
IMG 4255-2BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Kelly Dachtler, president of The Clymb, redefines outdoor retail.


Read more...

Fuel's gold

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
BY SOPHIA BENNETT

The coastal town of Coos Bay appears poised to land every economic development director’s dream: a single employer that will bring hundreds of family-wage jobs and millions in tax revenue. 


Read more...

Banishing oil burners reaps benefits for schools

News
Tuesday, April 01, 2014
04.02.14 thumb co2schoolsBY APRIL STREETER | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Three years ago, PPS set out to begin to convert the 1930s-era boilers from diesel/bunker fuel to cleaner-burning natural gas. Oregon’s largest school district has realized impressive carbon dioxide emissions reductions, setting an example for public and private institutions.


Read more...

What I'm reading: Brad Smith & Travis Boersma

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Brad Smith, founder of Hot Pepper Studios, and Travis Boersma, president of Dutch Bros. Coffee, share their recent reads.


Read more...

Spreading the wealth

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
HiResBY PAIGE PARKER

A money management firm broadens its reach. 


Read more...

The 2014 List: The Top 33 Large Companies to Work, For in Oregon

March 2014
Thursday, February 27, 2014

100best14logoWebOur 100 Best Companies project turned 21 this year, so pop open the Champagne. Our latest survey gives us plenty to cheer.

 


Read more...

Speeding up science

News
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
02.25.14 Thumbnail MedwasteBY JOE ROJAS-BURKE | OB BLOGGER

The medical research enterprise wastes tens of billions of dollars a year on irrelevant studies. It’s time to fix it.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS