University enrollment projected to increase

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, July 01, 2008

PSUcampus.jpg Portland State University's fall 2007
enrollment was almost 25,000 students.

STATEWIDE This fall, the Oregon University System expects another increase in enrollment, even though lenders of federally backed student loans are becoming more selective with their money in the ongoing credit crisis.

Last month Eastern Oregon University — a less selective, lower-tier school — said it had been dropped by some lenders. If the trend spreads to other schools, some prospective Oregon students, especially the neediest, could find it more difficult to get financing for tuition and housing costs, thus affecting enrollment.

OUS Board President Kirby Dyess calls the trend a “concern,” but says state initiatives like last year’s $50 million funding boost of the Oregon Opportunity Grant for middle and low-income students and the increased use of Oregon’s 529 Plan — a state-run college savings plan — should offset the downshift in the student loan industry.

And a down economy can mean more students, Dyess says. Students view it as an ideal to time to enhance their job marketability by gaining new skills or more education, she says. Initial data suggests a spike in state resident and first-generation college students.

Final enrollment figures will not be available until fall. Last year OUS reported a 1.5% nudge in enrollment, from 81,002 to 82,249.


JASON SHUFFLER


To comment, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

Oregon businesses face destruction from future earthquake

The Latest
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
htctthumb1BY KIM MOORE | RESEARCH EDITOR

An earthquake would completely destroy many Oregon businesses, highlighting the urgent need for the private and public sectors to collaborate on shoring up disaster preparedness, said panelists at an Oregon Business breakfast summit today.


Read more...

Knight Cancer Challenge No Biotech Dream

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

The Knight challenge is an important instance of philanthropy. But we should not assume it will magically transform OHSU into a business- and job-spinning engine for the local economy.


Read more...

6 things to know about the Amtrak Cascades route

The Latest
Friday, May 22, 2015
thumb3BY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

The recent tragedy in Philadelphia has called attention to Amtrak and the nation's woefully underfunded rail service. Here are six facts about the Amtrak Cascades corridor between Eugene and Vancouver B.C. 


Read more...

Picture This

May 2015
Monday, April 27, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

As a general rule, the more people with autism can be provided with visual cues, the better they will be able to understand and manage their environment. It’s a lesson Tom Keating learned well. The 61-year-old Eugene grant writer spent 31 years taking care of his autistic brother James, and in the late 1980s developed a spreadsheet that created a series of nonsense characters that grew or shrank depending on how much money James had in his account. 


Read more...

Frothy Battle

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ROBERT MULLIN

Latest development in Nestlé plant saga sparks debate about the value of water.


Read more...

Hall of Flame

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER

A Power Lunch at Oswego Grill.


Read more...

Up in the Air

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY ANNIE ELLISON

Portland tech veteran Ben Berry is leaving his post as Portland’s chief technology officer for a full-time role producing unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) aimed at first responders and the military. Berry’s AirShip Technologies Group is poised to be on the ground floor of an industry that will supply drones to as many as 100,000 police, fire and emergency agencies nationwide. He reveals the plan for takeoff.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS