Feds release LNG impact report

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, July 01, 2008

ASTORIA In a move that exemplifies the growing rift both within and without Oregon state government over liquefied natural gas terminals, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in June gave an environmental endorsement to a proposed project on the Columbia River. Days later, Oregon utility regulators said that importing LNG would be good for the region, despite an earlier DEQ report that came to the opposite conclusion.

Project backer Houston-based NorthernStar Natural Gas applauded the thumbs up as confirmation of what it calls a “salmon friendly” terminal. Gov. Ted Kulongoski, however, slammed FERC, saying in a statement that the agency was “irresponsibly considering this project only from the supply-side of the marketplace.”

The proposed $700 million terminal, which would sit 20 miles upriver from Astoria, would rewarm supercooled natural gas brought in by ship and then transport the gas via pipeline to markets in Oregon and California.

NorthernStar has spent the past five years developing a biological assessment and mitigation plan, which includes $56 million worth of salmon habitat restoration.

FERC’s analysis is not final approval for the project but it is an important procedural step, and it’s highly likely that environmental groups will challenge it. Or the challenge could come from the state, should it find problems after reviewing FERC’s findings.

NorthernStar also finds itself being attacked by citizen groups that are concerned about the environmental and land-use impact of the terminal and pipeline, and by Oregon’s Department of Energy, which says the state can better address its energy needs by importing gas from others states.

Spokesman Charles Deister says NorthernStar has tried to address every issue in its own studies. “All I can do is point to our extensively detailed record,” he says.


ABRAHAM HYATT


To comment, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

Help Wanted: Poached Jobs aids restaurateurs

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY JACOB PALMER | OB DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

“We thought there was room for something new.”


Read more...

Editor's Letter: Tortoise and the Hare

February 2015
Monday, January 26, 2015

The day after this issue goes to press, the city of Medford will host its annual business conference. The event features Minoli Ratnatunga, co-author of the Milken Institute’s annual “Best-Performing Cities” report. Preliminary data suggests that Medford is likely to retain its No. 1 ranking among best-performing small cities for having a higher concentration of high-tech firms than the national average. 


Read more...

Nuclear fingerprints

March 2015
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER | OB EDITOR

At Oregon State University, a 21st century version of the bad dream — nuclear terrorism — is alive and well. This winter, the Department of Nuclear Physics and Radiation Health Physics created a new interdisciplinary graduate emphasis in nuclear forensics, a Sherlock Holmes-sounding program that aims to identify how and where confiscated nuclear and radiological materials were created.


Read more...

Carbon Power

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Researchers in a multitude of disciplines are searching for ways to soak up excess carbon dioxide, the compound that contributes to global warming.


Read more...

How a Utah-based essential oils company cornered the Oregon market

March 2015
Friday, February 20, 2015
BY AMY MILSHTEIN | OB CONTRIBUTOR

Multilevel marketing, health claims and zyto scanner biofeedback machines: How dōTERRA thrives in Oregon. 


Read more...

The Carbon Calculus

February 2015
Friday, January 23, 2015
BY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

Carbon pricing is gaining momentum in Oregon, sparking concern for energy-intensive businesses — but also opportunity to expand a homespun green economy.


Read more...

MBA Perspective

February 2015
Tuesday, January 27, 2015
BY KIM MOORE

Robin Anderson, dean of the Pamplin School of Business, University of Portland: "You need people who are comfortable leading in ambiguity."


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS