Governor hopes to fund water initiative with new lottery money

| Print |  Email
Tuesday, July 01, 2008

water

SALEM Gov. Ted Kulongoski plans to ask voters to approve lottery money for his Headwaters to Ocean (H2O) initiative, which would fund water supply and quality needs, support related state agencies and set strategy for long-term management of water. Oregon is one of only two Western states without a comprehensive water plan.

Mike Carrier, the governor’s natural resources policy director, says Kulongoski plans to ask the 2009 Legislature to pass a referral bill to the voters asking for $100 million from projected new lottery dollars per biennium for 10 years. If approved, that bill likely will be on the November 2010 ballot, and begin funding in the 2011-2013 biennium.

“If you’re going to really make a meaningful impact, you’ve got to guarantee some resources over a period of time,” says Carrier. He says if voters don’t approve the lottery funding, “there is no backup plan.”


e-sources


pdf Headwaters to Ocean draft proposal

{safe_alt_text} Nature Conservancy's letter to the governor

{safe_alt_text} Water Supply and Conservation Initiative timeline

Water management in Oregon is fractured, contentious, underfunded and politicized, so with any water issue there always is debate. The Nature Conservancy in Oregon has told the governor it doesn’t support H2O because it lacks vision, is based on insufficient supply and demand information, has not adequately considered the environmental issues, and would have a negative impact on getting Measure 66 reauthorized. In 1998, voters approved M66, which set aside 7.5% of lottery funds for watershed restoration and habitat conservation for 15 years.

H2O is still in draft and Carrier emphasizes there will be more input from all stakeholders, such as water users, municipalities, environmental groups and legislators. He says H2O does not intend to create a new regulatory framework around water.

Rep. Jackie Dingfelder (D-Portland) says she hopes to hold a series of fall statewide sessions to get public input on water. Dingfelder, chair of the House Energy and Environment Committee, plans to present that input to the Oregon Business Council and the Legislature. “We have a silo mentality in this state on how we manage our water,” she says. “I’m trying to break through those silos.”  She says H2O is a good start, but “we can’t rely solely on this proposal for funding.”

There are some good things in H2O, says John DeVoe of WaterWatch, “but there’s going to have to be a lot of improvement before we can say it is what Oregon needs. The devil is always in the detail with water.”  

ROBIN DOUSSARD


To comment, email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

More Articles

Cherry Raincoat

June 2015
Tuesday, May 26, 2015
BY LINDA BAKER

Spring rains are the bane of an Oregon cherry farmer’s existence. Even a few sprinkles can crack the fruit so badly it’s not worth picking. Science to the rescue: Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a spray-on film that cuts rain-related cracking in half, potentially saving a season’s crop. The coating, patented as SureSeal, is made from natural chemicals similar to those found in the skins of cherries: cellulose, palm oil-based wax and calcium.


Read more...

Photo Log: The 2015 100 Best Green Workplaces in Oregon

The Latest
Wednesday, May 27, 2015
greenthumbPHOTOS BY JASON E. KAPLAN

Oregon Business celebrated the 100 Best Green Workplaces with an awards luncheon yesterday at the Nines Hotel in downtown Portland.


Read more...

Sun set

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY CHRIS NOBLE

The right sunglasses can protect your eyes and look cool at the same time. This being the 21st century, select shades are socially conscious, too. Portland brand Shwood uses wood and other natural materials and manufactures locally. Founded by Ann Sacks, the brand Fetch dedicates a portion of its profits to animal welfare. But whether you choose classic tortiseshell or aviator chic, please, shed the sunglasses when you walk in the door — and, of course, at night. 


Read more...

The 5 highest revenue-generating parks in Oregon

The Latest
Thursday, June 11, 2015
parksthumbBY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

In 2014, total revenue for camping and day use in Oregon State Parks was a little more than $17 million. That figure may even higher this year "because we've had exceptionally nice weather," Hughes says.


Read more...

5 stats about Oregon fireworks

The Latest
Thursday, June 18, 2015
fireworksthumb001BY JACOB PALMER | DIGITAL NEWS EDITOR

Fireworks are a booming industry, even if the pyrotechnics have turned July 4th into a day fire marshals, and many residents, love to hate.


Read more...

Efficiency Boost

June 2015
Friday, May 22, 2015
BY JOE CORTRIGHT

How conservation stimulates the local economy.


Read more...

The Backstory: Portland Youth Builders

The Latest
Wednesday, June 03, 2015
blog002 1BY JASON E. KAPLAN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

As part of our green workplaces story, Oregon Business checked out a community service project undertaken by Portland Youth Builders, a nonprofit alternative high school. In partnership with Whole Foods, PYB built garden boxes for a Home Forward  housing site. Home Forward is a government agency that provides housing for low income residents and people with disabilities.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS