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July 2008
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1 Start me up
2 In good company
3 Munich on the Willamette
4 Governor hopes to fund water initiative with new lottery money
5 Oregon’s top private companies learn to adapt
6 Circuit judges become scarce in rural counties
7 Reader survey shows impact of credit market squeeze
8 Economist Tim Duy uses the "R" word
9 Food manufacturing: steady over time
10 Deal Watch: FLIR wins record-setting defense contract
11 Oregon's Private 150
12 Oregon's Private 150: Ranks 51-100
13 Oregon's Private 150: Ranks 101-150
14 Tactics: LaCrosse Footwear gets some traction
15 Boosting sales in a down economy
16 Powering down at the office
17 100 Best files: Top 10 most important workplace attributes
18 Q&A with Bob of Bob's Red Mill
19 Feds release LNG impact report
20 Sales decline prompts Mt. Bachelor shakeup
21 Rosy forecast sees 100,000 jobs on the horizon
22 Lumber prices and output chopped
23 Oregon Business honored for journalism excellence
24 University enrollment projected to increase
25 Graphic: Creative vitality map of Oregon
26 State wins case against Merck
27 Housing slump continues to pull down projects, sales, companies
28 Graphic: wholesale value of Oregon floriculture crops
29 PDX ranks high with travelers despite flight cutbacks
30 Downtown Redmond freed from traffic
31 Graphic: Northwest invention patents rise
32 Next: an electronic shoe
33 Lithia cuts jobs, millions
34 HP pulls out of Corvallis chamber
35 Fuel prices hit trucking
36 Weather delays fruit crop
37 Angels arrive in the Gorge
38 Oregon financial planners & money managers
39 April '08 employment and business indicators
40 April '08 transportation indicators
41 April '08 real estate and construction indicators
42 April '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
 

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Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


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Shifting Ground

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

Bans on genetically modified crops create uncertainty for farmers.


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Water World

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Fred Ziari aims to feed the global population.


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What I'm Reading

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Peter Lizotte at ACME Business Solutions and Roger Busse at Pacific Continental Bank share their favorite reads.


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Political Clout

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY KIM MOORE

Businesses spend billions of dollars each year trying to influence political decision makers by piling money into campaigns.


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Fly Zone

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JOE ROJAS-BURKE

The black soldier fly’s larvae are among the most ravenous and least picky eaters on earth.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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