Sponsored by Oregon Business

Wyden’s forest plan hopes to bridge extremes

| Print |  Email
Friday, August 01, 2008

PORTLAND Sen. Ron Wyden has proposed a strategy to break free from what he labels the “dysfunctional and dangerous” management of federal forestlands in Oregon and clear the way for doubling the timber harvest.

Long mired in battles between industry and environmental groups, federal harvests have been sharply curtailed over the past several decades. That has created a tinderbox that is the “single greatest threat to communities and private land owners,” says Wyden’s chief of staff, Josh Kardon.  

“By putting this forward now and showing that he is willing to take some risks, Ron hopes to send a signal to the next president that there is a third path that avoids the old forest politics of the last two decades that can move us forward ecologically and economically.”

Wyden’s plan calls for protecting old-growth trees while allowing logging that is environmentally sound and helps reduce fire danger. The plan, now in the public comment period before the formal bill is written, was developed with the help of the Nature Conservancy, two forest scientists and four industry leaders. When it was unveiled in late June, the industry leaders were noticeably absent from public support of the plan. Kardon, who declined to identify those participants, says their concerns were about the old-growth protection.

Wyden’s plan calls for no logging of trees older that 120 years in wet forests, and no logging of trees more than 150 years old in dry forests. It also bans clear-cutting. (The entire proposal can be found at wyden.senate.gov/forestproposal.) Kardon says talks are continuing with a broader group of timber industry people, and adds that environmental groups have commented that the plan’s forest protection isn’t strong enough.

And that’s just the kind of debate that has raged for decades.

“At some point you’ve got to figure out how to move forward,” says Kardon. “It’s not going to be anyone’s perfect bill. But we hope that all sides will realize that continuing in the fashion of the past two decades is going to lead to ruin for both sides.”


Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

More Articles

Rail revival

Linda Baker
Wednesday, November 11, 2015
111115-OregonShortLineRailCarTHUMBBY LINDA BAKER

“What we’ve seen traditionally over the past few decades is a reduction of short line railroads. This is a rare opportunity to see a line being opened.”


Straight shooter

Linda Baker
Thursday, October 08, 2015
100815-bradleyBY LINDA BAKER

In an era dominated by self-promotion and marketing speak, John Bradley, CEO of R&H Construction, is a breath of fresh air.


Where Do We Go from Here?

Guest Blog
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
102115-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | CFA

Volatility reigned supreme over the summer. The old Wall Street adage of, “Sell in May and go away,” was prophetic in 2015.


Video: 100 Best Nonprofits to Work For in Oregon 2015

The Latest
Monday, October 05, 2015
100-best-NP-logo-2015-video-thumbVIDEO BY JESSE LARSON

Profiling some of the organizations featured in the 2015 list.


The High Road

November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

As CEO and owner of five different cannabis-related businesses generating a total net revenue of $2 million, Alex Rogers could sit back and ride the lucrative wave of Oregon’s burgeoning pot industry.



Linda Baker
Thursday, November 12, 2015
111215-taxilindaBY LINDA BAKER

Raye Miles, a 17-year taxi industry veteran, lacked the foresight to anticipate the single biggest trend in the cab business: breaking the law.


Company Present Accepted

November/December 2015
Wednesday, October 28, 2015

’Tis the season of giving — and that goes far beyond trees drowning in Lego sets and ironic knitwear. Santa Claus knows corporations are people too, in need of gifts to warm the hearts (and stomachs) of even the most Grinch-like CFOs.

Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02