October 2008
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1 Oregon's craft beer industry grows up
2 Q&A: Jack Joyce, co-founder and CEO, Rogue Ales
3 Q&A: Gary Fish, founder and CEO, Deschutes Brewery
4 Q&A: Kurt and Rob Widmer, founders, Widmer Brothers Brewery
5 Q&A: Irene Firmat, co-founder and CEO, Full Sail
6 Funds for toxic cleanup uncertain
7 Urban-rural wage gap is steady
8 Oregon banks continue slide
9 Readers vote for president and priorities
10 Outlets upswing
11 The comeback
12 Tactics: The operative
13 Should executives share the pain of pay cuts?
14 Don’t cut marketing when things get slow
15 Q&A with Paddle Palace CEO
16 State slams FERC’s LNG approval
17 No reel improvement
18 Housing market still hurting
19 PSU get record grant
20 The new plastics
21 Next: the GlideCycle
22 Economist John Mitchell: The end of the way we were
23 Deal Watch: Grant helps OSU research biofuel crops
24 Employment services industry is shedding jobs monthly
25 Rise of the LLCs
26 Graphic: Higher wheat price lifts PDX grain traffic
27 Air service returns to 2 rural towns
28 State energy officials tilting at windmills
29 Graphic: Oregon film and video industry grows 66%, 2002-07
30 Don’t ask; read my Twitter
31 Eastern dry-land wheat farmers ask for relief
32 Graphic: Oregon employment by business size
33 Industry glut clouds solar job forecast
34 Olympics buoy swim clubs
35 July '08 employment and business indicators
36 July '08 transportation indicators
37 July '08 real estate and construction indicators
38 July '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
 

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Kill the Meeting

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY AMY MILSHTEIN

Meetings get a bad rap. A few local companies make them count.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


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Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


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The clean fuels opportunity

News
Monday, November 10, 2014
111014-dirtyfuel-thumbBY KIM MOORE | OB RESEARCH EDITOR

A market for low-carbon transportation fuels has a chance to flourish in Oregon if regulators adopt the second phase of the state’s Clean Fuels Program.


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Corner Office: Steve Tatone

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

Seven tidbits about the president and CEO of AKT Group.


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Streetfight

News
Sunday, December 07, 2014
BY LINDA BAKER

On Friday, Uber switched on an app — and with one push of the button torpedoed Portland’s famed public process.


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