Home Archives October 2008 No reel improvement

No reel improvement

| Print |  Email
Wednesday, October 01, 2008

STATEWIDE Independently run theaters that charge less than the big boys don’t seem to be reaping the benefits of more moviegoers with less cash to spend in the down economy.

“We’re dealing with the same costs as larger theaters, but we can’t afford to raise our prices,” says Andrew McElderry, owner of Skylight Theatre and Andrew’s Pizza in Hood River. Tickets at the Skylight range from $2.50 to $8.50.

Those costs, McElderry says, include the rising prices of commodities, such as corn. “Things like popcorn, for example, are costing us a lot more money,” he says.

Popcorn, a major source of revenue for the small theater industry, is something Tom Ranieri, owner and operator of Cinema 21 in Portland, knows a little about.

“Concessions certainly are a huge part of our business,” Ranieri says. “People have shown that they’re willing to spend an enormous amount on concessions.” A movie with food at major theater chains can cost upward of $20. At Ranieri’s theater, moviegoers can save about $8-$10 on an evening out.

There has been some concern about the future of the small-theater business, “but there’s no way to project how it will turn out,” says McElderry. “All bets are off.”

If you’re a small-theater, how do you compete?

“Good programming,” says Ranieri. “People will look at the value of the film and decide for themselves.”                       

CHRIS MILLER



Have an opinion? E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


 

More Articles

Small business sales go big

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014

BY BRANDON SAWYER

Sales of small businesses surged in 2013 according to the biggest Internet marketplace of such transactions, BizBuySell, increasing to 7,056 reported sales, a 24% increase over 2012, when they dropped 7%. Portland Metro sales tracked by the site grew 9% to 73, capping three years of solid growth. On top of that, Portland’s median sale price jumped 67% to $250K, versus just 13% to $180K nationally. Portland was one of just six metros tracked where the median sale price matched the median asking price, with sellers getting, on average, 92% of what they asked.

BTNMarch14 tableBTNMarch14 line


BTNMarch14 piePDXBTNMarch14 pieUSA


Read more...

Q & A with Chuck Eggert

News
Thursday, March 06, 2014
03.06.14 thumb pacfoodsBY HANNAH WALLACE | OB BLOGGER

The founder of Pacific Foods talks about why his company has flown under the radar in Oregon, how saving a family-run chicken hatchery has helped his bottom line and why he thinks organic food is anything but elitist.


Read more...

Airbnb laws will hurt Portland’s newest company

News
Wednesday, April 23, 2014
airbnb-logoBY CLIFF HOCKLEY | OB GUEST CONTRIBUTOR

Proposed regulations protect Portland’s strict zoning codes and hotel operators, but they may have an adverse effect on Airbnb’s business.


Read more...

Fuel's gold

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
BY SOPHIA BENNETT

The coastal town of Coos Bay appears poised to land every economic development director’s dream: a single employer that will bring hundreds of family-wage jobs and millions in tax revenue. 


Read more...

Revolution in print, pixels and passion

News
Tuesday, March 11, 2014
RyanFrankNewsBY MARK BLAINE | OB BLOGGER

The publisher of the Emerald Media Group moves on, leaving a cutting edge media group that depends on business acumen for its survival.


Read more...

Spreading the wealth

March 2014
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
HiResBY PAIGE PARKER

A money management firm broadens its reach. 


Read more...

Are millennials reshaping politics in the Pacific Northwest?

News
Wednesday, April 02, 2014

MillennialsThumbA new report explores the impact of millennials on Oregon's business and political climate.


Read more...
Oregon Business magazinetitle-sponsored-links-02
SPONSORED LINKS