December 2008
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# Article Title
1 The sky is not falling
2 Where did they go?
3 Down the line
4 Out of the frying pan
5 Car dealers collapse as sales drive off a cliff
6 The boxer rebellion
7 Readers put forth their legislative agenda
8 Economist Tim Duy tempers state's optimism
9 Holiday job outlook hurt by retail trimming
10 Deal Watch: Room to grow for Willamette Valley Vineyards
11 Rates on the rise
12 Q&A with Jeff Merkley on business
13 Telecom suffers and shrinks
14 Goodies can’t hold Hynix or Freightliner
15 Bottle bill changes uncork opposition
16 Graphic: Region's ski areas have bumpy ride
17 Banks get cash infusion
18 Food industry helps the hungry
19 Graphic: Portland ranks low among metros for charitable fundraising
20 Politics beat bucks in ballot measures battle
21 Mergers don’t help Oregon employment
22 Amazon on the Columbia
23 California's marine reserve efforts may shed light on Oregon's
24 Taking the temp at the job fairs
25 Summit agenda full of urgency
26 Recession? Not at the Christmas shops
27 Graphic: Oregon Christmas trees sold by species
28 A tiny fashion cluster
29 Keeping employee spirits up in a downturn
30 Trimming the office party without cutting the fun
31 September '08 employment and business indicators
32 September '08 transportation indicators
33 September '08 real estate and construction indicators
34 September '08 farming, natural resources and energy indicators
35 Next: a meth map
 

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Shuffling the Deck

November/December 2014
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
BY JON BELL

Oregon tribes still bet on casinos.


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Two Sides of the Coin

Contributed Blogs
Wednesday, October 22, 2014
22 twosidesBY JASON NORRIS

Historically, when the leaves fall, so do the markets. This year, earnings, Europe, energy and Ebola have in common? Beyond alliteration, they are four factors that the investors are pointing to for this year’s seasonal volatility.


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Tackling the CEO-worker pay gap

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY OREGON BUSINESS STAFF

An SEC rule targets the disparity between executive and employee compensation, reigniting a long-standing debate about corporate social responsibility.


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Corner Office: Marv LaPorte

January-Powerbook 2015
Saturday, December 13, 2014

The president of LaPorte & Associates lets us in on his day-to-day life.


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Free Falling

Contributed Blogs
Thursday, December 18, 2014
121714-oilprice-thumbBY JASON NORRIS | OB CONTRIBUTOR

The implosion of the energy complex: The best thing for low oil prices is low oil prices.


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Editor's Letter: Power Play

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014

There’s a fascinating article in the December issue of the Harvard Business Review about a profound power shift taking place in business and society. It’s a long read, but the gist revolves around the tension between “old power” and “new power” as a driver of transformation. Here’s an excerpt:

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.

The authors, Henry Timms and Jeremy Heimans, don’t necessarily favor one form of power over another but merely outline how power is transitioning, and how companies can take advantage of these changes to strengthen their positions in the marketplace. 

Our Powerbook issue might be viewed as a case study in the new-power transition. This annual book of lists provides information on leading businesses, nonprofits and universities in the state. Most of the featured companies are entrenched power players now pursuing more flexible and less hierarchical approaches to doing business. Law firms, for example, are adopting new technologies and fee structures to make legal services more accessible and affordable.

This month we also take a look at a controversial new U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission rule requiring public companies to disclose the median pay of workers, as well as the ratio between CEO and median-worker pay. 

Part of the 2010 Dodd-Frank financial reform law, the rule will compel public companies to be more open about employee compensation, with the assumption that greater transparency will improve corporate performance and, perhaps, help address one of the major challenges of our time: income inequality.

New power is not only about strategy and tactics, the Harvard Business Review authors say. “The ultimate questions are ethical. The big question is whether new power can genuinely serve the common good and confront society’s most intractable problems.”

That sounds like a call to arms. Or a New Year’s resolution. Old power or new, the goals are the same: to be a force for positive change in the world. Happy 2015!

— Linda


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Justice for All

January-Powerbook 2015
Thursday, December 11, 2014
BY JESSICA RIDGWAY

Lawger upends the typical hourly based fee model by letting clients determine the cost.


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