The 2009 Top 34 Medium Companies to Work For in Oregon

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Sunday, March 01, 2009




NUMBER 4:

MEDIUM COMPANIES
Companies with 50 TO 249 employees worldwide
2009 2008 Company
Industry
City
Website
Benefits and Compensation
Work Environment
Decision Making and Trust
Performance Management
Career Dev and Learning
Employer Benefits Survey
TOTAL
4 8 Jordan Schrader Ramis PC Lake Oswego 89.8 91.8 89.4 86.8 82.2 76.7 516.70
Law firm jordanschrader.com

No. 4 Medium Company: Jordan Schrader Ramis
Jordan Schrader Ramis is a five-time 100 Best winner knows work hours can be long and stressful, so perks of the job are that much more important to retain employees. Like leaving early on Fridays during the summer and good food. The monthly luncheons are popular with everyone, and in particular the chicken enchiladas. Says one employee: "We have fun activities that build unity like movie night for the entire firm and their families, bowling, or our summer picnic. It is important to me to work for an ethical firm that strives to always do the right thing by their clients and employees. This is a great place to work and I'm proud to say I'm an employee."
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